"High Ground" Shown at U.S. Central Command in Tampa, Florida

Last Friday, our film High Ground, highlighting the struggles of injured soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan as they re-enter a civilian world, was shown at USCENTCOM (U.S. Central Command) in Tampa.  Major General Michael Garrett presided over our visit. We learned such a screening was unprecedented in USCENTCOM history, a huge honor for us all.

High Ground portrays our first Soldiers to Summits (S2S) program, culminating in the climb of a steep and icy Lobuche, 20,075 feet and eight miles from Everest.  I was in Tampa with S2S participants Steve Baskis and Aaron Hale,  both blinded on the battlefield. They added a lot of reality to this very powerful story. This showing was arranged by Major Brian Smith, an S2S supporter from the outset, now a member of our Advisory Board, who is based at USCENTCOM.

Steve Baskis and Aaron Hale watch "High Ground" Steve Baskis and Aaron Hale watching "High Ground"

USCENTCOM is our military command for the Mideast (minus Israel), from Egypt to Pakistan. Security there was extremely tight, with frequent electronic screenings of individuals in between closed doors, and with rooms electronically swept for bugs after people exited a critical office.

High Ground was produced by Don Hahn of Beauty and the Beast and The Lion King fame, and directed by Michael Brown, who produced the award-winning documentary of my Everest climb, Farther Than the Eye Can See. The power of High Ground was evident in the emotional response of MG Garrett - who has commanded many combat forces - as he made closing remarks to the mostly military audience.

Charley Mace, Aaron Hale, Steve Baskis, MG Garrett,  Erik Weihenmayer and Yuri, Brian Smith, Ed Weihenmayer Charley Mace, Aaron Hale, Steve Baskis, MG Garrett, Erik Weihenmayer and Yuri, Brian Smith, Ed Weihenmayer

High Ground engenders heightened respect for our service men and women who volunteer to serve our country,  and especially for those soldiers who incur life-changing war injuries. We owe them all our great thanks.

This is the Nepalese liaison at USCENTCOM. My adopted son, Arjun, is from Nepal as well. At USCENTCOM, they have representatives from 53 countries, and he is only one from Nepal. This is the Nepalese liaison at USCENTCOM. My adopted son, Arjun, is from Nepal as well. At USCENTCOM, they have representatives from 53 countries, and he is only one from Nepal.