Blog posts in Mountaineering

Backpacker Magazine Article - Blind Photography

Take a look at the current (June 2010) issue of Backpacker for a brief article about how I learned to become a photographer. Now I know what you’re thinking: a blind photographer is as much of an oxymoron as a blind climber! Well it just so happens I learned to take photographs on a climbing trip.

Veni, Vidi, Vici — Ham and Eggs Couloir

After great ice climbing in the Adirondaks and Scotland this past winter with my climbing partner Ian Osteyee, we were ready for another big adventure. This time, we set our sights on Ham and Eggs Couloir on Moose’s Tooth in the Ruth Gorge of the Alaska Range. We rounded out our team with Jay Abbey, a 56-year-old granddad and total stud, who is a friend of Ian’s. Although Moose’s Tooth is not particularly high (10,335 feet), it is just 15 miles from Denali, the highest peak in North America.

Spring Skiing Fever

This spring, I have been training for two big climbs that have been on my tick list for quite some time: the Moose’s Tooth in the Alaska Range (stay tuned for a trip report) and Alpamayo in the Peruvian Andes. Both ascents consist of long, sustained ice climbing and are a good test of physical and mental endurance. In addition to physical conditioning in the gym, I also try to spend a few long, hard days in the cold and wind to train my mind against the challenges of the mountain.

Team Sight Unseen scores award!

I am very excited for a friend of mine, Kyle Coon, who recently won $10,000 from the Gore-Tex Experience More Challenge to climb Aconcagua, the tallest peak in the Western Hemisphere, with his friends, Justin Grant (who is visually impaired), Brad Jaffke, Peter Green, Joseph Mayfield, and Ben Meyer. The name of their expedition is Team Sight Unseen.

Erik Climbs Mt. Ararat, The Mythical Resting Place of Noah's Ark

Rising high into the thin dry air of eastern Turkey, Mt. Ararat stands at almost 17,000 feet. Some geologists believe Ararat to be the largest single-mass of mountain in the world, since it rises uninterrupted from the surrounding plains at 2,000 feet, while most other large peaks stand in mountain ranges with less differential.

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